RCM Annual Conference

Programme

The RCM Annual Conference 2017 programme can be viewed below.

The format of this year’s conference was different to previous years. The programme strands ran concurrently on Day 1 and Day 2.

MAIN PROGRAMME

  • MAIN

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • MAIN

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    PLENARY SESSION 1
    RCM CHIEF EXECUTIVE WELCOME ADDRESS

    Chair: Suzanne Tyler, director for services to members, RCM

    Speaker: Gill Walton, chief executive, RCM

    In her first address to the membership, the new RCM chief executive Gill Walton will be taking to the stage to welcome delegates to the first ever free RCM annual conference. She will be setting out her vision for the RCM as she takes up the reins amid some significant changes and challenges within the profession. But what will this mean for the membership? Gill will be explaining more during her repeated speech at the beginning of both days of the conference.


  • MAIN

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    PLENARY SESSION 2
    LET’S TALK LEADERSHIP

    Chair: Gail Johnson, professional advisor for education, RCM

    Speaker: Helen Bailey, author

    Huffington Post has referred to the leadership philosophy of ’Host Leadership’ or ‘leader-as-host’ as ‘a new paradigm for leadership’ and Helen is a proponent. After 20 years in banking, she has pursued her interest in performance improvement through coaching and now works to understand organisations’ challenges and identify and implement solutions to bring about change. Taking to the stage for conference’s motivational session, Helen will explore her approach to leadership and change through collaboration, coaching and influencing. Are you ready to embrace a new way of leading?

    This session will be repeated at 14.30.


  • MAIN

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    PLENARY SESSION 3
    QUESTION TIME 1: POLITICAL AWARENESS: AT THE HEART OF CHANGE

    Chair: Jon Skewes, director for policy, employment relations and communications, RCM

    Speakers: Jacqui Dunkley-Bent, head of maternity, children and young people, NHS England, Karen Jewell, nursing officer (maternity and early years), Welsh Government,Verena Wallace, midwifery officer, Department of Health, Northern Ireland and Professor Ann Holmes, chief midwifery advisor and associate nursing officer, Scottish Government

    A collective unified voice is a powerful one, but as a profession, midwives and MSWs don’t utilise this power as well as they could. But why is this? This debate will cover how you can influence your working environment on a local and national level. By being proactive and politically minded, you can ensure your voice is heard, whether that is within a maternity unit or trust, or within a wider sphere, such as influencing national policy or lobbying MPs. Join panelists from the four countries – Jacqui Dunkley-Bent, Karen Jewell, and Verena Wallace – to discuss the role of the midwife and MSW in bringing about positive change.


  • MAIN

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    PLENARY SESSION 4
    LET’S TALK LEADERSHIP

    Chair: Gail Johnson, professional advisor for education, RCM

    Speaker: Helen Bailey, author

    Huffington Post has referred to the leadership philosophy of ‘Host Leadership’ or ‘leader-as-host’ as ‘a new paradigm for leadership’ and Helen is a proponent. After 20 years in banking, she has pursued her interest in performance improvement through coaching and now works to understand organisations’ challenges and identify and implement solutions to bring about change. Taking to the stage for conference’s motivational session, Helen will explore her approach to leadership and change through collaboration, coaching and influencing. Are you ready to embrace a new way of leading?

    This session is a repeat of the 10:45 session.



  • MAIN

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    PLENARY SESSION 5
    QUESTION TIME 2: SUPERVISION: LOVE IT OR HATE IT?

    Chair: Carmel Lloyd, head of education and learning, RCM

    Speakers: Jess Read, previous LSAMO and now regional maternity lead for London, NHS England (London), Deb Jackson, head of midwifery and associate director of nursing, Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, Karen Murray, senior professional officer, Northern Ireland Practice and Education Council (NIPEC), Professor Ann Holmes, chief midwifery advisor and associate nursing officer, Carmel McCalmont, associate director of nursing/head of midwifery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust and Sarah Dunn, midwife/supervisor of midwives, Broomfield Hospital Maternity Unit

    The 1 April 2017 was a turning point in the profession’s history – statutory supervision ceased. For many, it was a sad and confusing moment. How would the profession function effectively without it? What would its replacement be? Who would drive its implementation? After six months, we take a look at what’s happening in the four countries. What’s working? What’s not? What do you think about the situation? Come along with your thoughts, ideas, experiences and questions for the panelists – Jess Read, Deb Jackson, Karen Murray, Ann Holmes and Sarah Dunn.


  • MAIN

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    IF YOU DO NOT BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, NO-ONE ELSE WILL

    Chair: Kathryn Gutteridge, president, RCM

    Speaker: Dr Miranda Brawn, multi-award winning legal, business and diversity leader

    With the development of strong leadership being key to the success of sustaining an effective workforce, and this being central to the profession, particularly at the moment, when midwifery is facing so many changes and challenges, join Dr Miranda Brawn who will be giving her insight into leadership and how you can create positive change.


  • MAIN

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    CONFERENCE PARTY

    Ticket only event.
    Click here to find out more and book your tickets


STUDENT PROGRAMME

  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 1
    RCM PRESIDENT WELCOME ADDRESS

    Chair: Day 1: Alana Divito , SMF member Day 2: Jenny Pope, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Day 1: Kathryn Gutteridge, president, RCM Day 2: Jacque Gerrard, director, RCM England

    She was only inaugurated recently, but Kathryn Gutteridge will be opening this year’s conference with her first official address to the RCM’s student membership. Kathryn is an established consultant midwife with a long history in clinical care within the NHS, and works at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust. Passionate about women’s issues and particularly in relation to childbearing, Kathryn has a reputation for representing women’s psychological and mental wellbeing during this vulnerable stage of their lives. Student delegates shouldn’t miss this welcome by such an incredibly experienced and well-known face within the profession.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 2
    HUMAN RIGHTS MATTER IN CHILDBIRTH

    Chair: Day 1: Alana Divito, SMF member Day 2: Jenny Pope, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Rebecca Schiller, chief executive, Birthrights

    Rebecca is the head of the UK’s only organisation dedicated to improving women’s experience of pregnancy and childbirth by promoting respect for human rights, so she is the ideal motivational speaker on women’s voices. But why do human rights in childbirth matter? How can a human rights perspective help you as a student midwife? And how can information around the importance of women’s dignity and choice be disseminated? Rebecca will look to answer these questions and more, so don’t miss the first main student session after the RCM president.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 3
    ARE YOU NATURALLY RESILIENT?

    Chair: Day 1: Charlene Cole, SMF member Day 2: Alice Kersey, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Lesley Choucri senior lecturer part time, University of Salford

    Lesley is senior lecturer at the University of Salford and she will talk about the programme of resilience and self-care that she has developed as part of a preceptorship programme. She has more than three decades of experience in midwifery practice, education, management and research and has managed maternity, gynaecology and children’s services in the NHS, instigated new ways of working through designing midwife-led care and worked across the interfaces of education, clinical practice and research.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 4
    THE THREE YEARS ARE COMING TO AN END… WHAT NOW?

    Chair: Day 1: Alice Kersey, SMF member, RCM Day 2: Louise Webster, SMF member, RCM

    Speakers: Sarah Snow, head of department & lead midwife for education, Oxford Brookes University and Jude Jones, birth centre midwife, Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

    The road from student to newly qualified midwife requires an even broader range of skills and development than your clinical knowledge and assignment skillset, involving job applications and interviews. Preceptorship and becoming a qualified practising midwife are every students’ ultimate goal. But what are the skills required? What will make your application stand out from the rest? What does the interview process entail? How does preceptorship work? And what should you consider in making the transition from student to newly qualified midwife? Oxford Brookes University’s head of department & lead midwife for education, Sarah Snow and Jude Jones, a previous RCM Student Midwives Forum member and a qualified midwife for the past two years, guide you to success.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 5
    MEDIA: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE SOCIAL

    Chair : Day 1: Elizabeth Barilli, SMF member, RCM Day 2: Charlene Cole, SMF member, RCM

    Speakers: Day 1: Natalie Linder, labour ward coordinator, Western Sussex NHS Foundation Trust / board deputy chair, RCM, Day 2: Ellie Durrant, Cara Evans, student midwife, University of Nottingham and Hana Pauls, midwife and naturopathic doctor, Liverpool Women’s Hospital and start of One Born Every Minute.

    Social media has revolutionised the way we interact with one another. Its impact is felt in every aspect of our personal and professional lives and no more is this true with the life of a student midwife. As the NMC highlights: ‘If used responsibly and appropriately, social networking sites can build and maintain professional relationships; establish support networks to discuss specific issues with other healthcare professionals globally; and access resources for CPD.’ How this can be achieved, the ways it can be used as a learning tool and for keeping up to date with research will be explored by midwife blogger Ellie Durant and the RCM’s student winner of the ICM competition, Cara Evans.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 6
    YOU’VE GOT 90 SECONDS

    Chair: Rachel Evans, SMF member, RCM


    Speaker: Gill Walton, chief executive, RCM

    Do you have an idea that you think could change an aspect of maternity care for the better? If so, then the new RCM chief executive Gill Walton will want to know all about it. You will need to submit your ideas before the session, in writing, and a selection will be chosen to present them to Gill within a 90-second timeframe. Gill will decide, with the help of the audience, who wins a prize. In previous years, Cathy Warwick has taken a keen interest in the enthusiastic suggestions from students, and we’re sure Gill won’t be any different. So why not start having a think now?


MSW PROGRAMME

  • MSW

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 1

    HOW DO MSWs FIT INTO THE CHANGING MATERNITY SERVICE?

    Chair: Suzanne Tyler, director for services to members, RCM

    Speakers: Cherylene Dougan, maternity care assistant, Dumfries and Galloway, Abbie Aplin, director of midwifery and maternity, and Justine West, Band 3 maternity support worker, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust.



    In light of the latest reviews into maternity services – Better Births and the Best Start – an impact on MSWs and the way they work will be inevitable. This has the potential to open up opportunities to MSWs, shaping maternity care of the future. But what are some MSWs already doing in UK trusts and beyond? We hear from two – Portsmouth and Dumfries & Galloway. MSWs are playing a key role in a continuity of carer model at Portsmouth for women undergoing caesareans; and Cherylene Dougan talks about her experience as a member of the sub-group of Scotland’s Best Start. Hear their stories and take the opportunity to ask a question to find out more.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 2
    EXPLORING THE SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

    Chair/Speaker: Denise Linay, head of organising and engagement, RCM

    Speaker: Richard Griffin, senior research fellow, King\'s College London



    The role, banding and training received by MSWs varies widely across the countries, in fact, even the job title can be different. Why not join us in a debate with Richard Griffin, who’s been commissioned by the RCM to gather data about MSWs’ roles, attitudes, learning, tasks and supervision, and the RCM’s head of organising and engagement Denise Linay to look at your experiences in your trusts and what the future holds for the role. Richard will be showcasing the results of his research and discussing how the results can drive future developments. This is a chance for you to speak out and discuss the issues in this Q&A-style discussion.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 3
    MSWs CARING FOR VULNERABLE WOMEN

    Chair: Karen Edwards, regional head England South, RCM

    Speakers: Sasha Barber, mental health and bereavement lead, Women and Children’s Health Southmead Hospital and Mark Williams, international fathers mental health campaigner, speaker and trainer, Fathers Reaching Out

    Would you like to learn more about caring for those women who’ve suffered a bereavement or who are coping with mental health issues? In a recent survey MSWs identified these as the top two issues they wanted more information and learning on, hence this was introduced to the programme. So why not come along and engage with Sasha Barber, Mental Health & Bereavement Lead, Women & Children’s Health Southmead Hospital along with a perinatal mental health specialist and a father, Mark Williams, who’s wife’s postnatal depression affected his own mental health? It promises to be a really interesting and insightful session.


ABSTRACT PROGRAMME

  • ABSTRACTS

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    WOMEN FIRST
    POSITIVE PARENTHOOD: PROVIDING SPECIALIST CARE FOR WOMEN WITH PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS

    Chair: Kate Evans , board member, RCM

    Speakers: Daisy Kelly, specialist midwife for perinatal mental health, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

    Deaths from psychiatric problems are a leading cause of maternal mortality, with cases having remained high over the last decade. Aside from the effects of suicide on the family, there is a profound, intergenerational effect of poor mental health on the infant. At this trust, there is a specialist perinatal multidisciplinary approach to address the problem. There is a weekly multidisciplinary clinic with the specialist obstetrician, specialist midwife for perinatal mental health, the perinatal psychiatrist, perinatal nurse, and pharmacist. This enables women to be seen quickly by the appropriate practitioner. A weekly meeting is held to review and discuss cases, attended by the IAPT and health visiting services. This ensures that the entire perinatal period is represented, and women are provided with the specialist care they deserve. The specialist midwife has provided mandatory perinatal mental health training for all midwives to equip them with confidence to ask women about their mental wellbeing. She has also developed a guideline for the management of perinatal mental health disorders, and a care pathway to standardise the care offered to all women. Just 10 months after the introduction of this approach, there are numerous success stories of women feeling supported and empowered.


    POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER POST CHILDBIRTH. WOMEN’S AND MIDWIVES’ EXPERIENCES OF INTERACTING DURING LABOUR AND BIRTH - AN INTERPRETATIVE PHENOMENOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Speakers: Jennifer Patterson, midwife and PhD student, Napier University, Edinburgh

    Up to 9% of women may develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - Post Childbirth (PTSD-PC) with significant implications for the health of the mother, child, family, and healthcare services. One important factor contributing to PTSD-PC is the woman’s experience of care provision. And a major feature of this is the quality of interaction with the healthcare provider. Some women with PTSD-PC describe midwives as ‘hostile’, ‘dismissive’ and ‘uncaring’. This study sought to develop deeper understanding of the interactions during labour and birth, from the perspective of both women with PTSD-PC and midwives. The study findings will enable development of appropriate education for midwives to help them meet the needs of this specific group of women. Initial findings show that women describe feeling unsafe and hold the view that midwives do not care or have time for them. They express feeling as though they are a nuisance to the midwives, who sometimes responded in an openly negative way towards them. A deeper understanding of the experience of this interaction, from both the perspective of the woman and the midwife, will enable development of guidance, education and support of midwives to meet the needs of the women.


  • ABSTRACTS

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    LEADERSHIP FOR ALL
    VISIBLE MIDWIFERY LEADERSHIP ON THE LABOUR WARD: REDEFINING THE ROLE OF THE MATRON

    Chair: Giuseppe Labriola, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Maxine Spencer, director of midwifery, Kings College Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust

    An important aspect of high quality midwifery care is ensuring the midwifery workforce, with the right skills, are in the right place at the right time. A director of midwifery talks about the changes she made to achieve this. She shares how she has used leadership theories in practice, managed change within existing financial controls, influenced the human factors involved in the change management process and built a new team. Part of the process involved a closer look at the role of labour ward matron, resulting in a challenge to the usual practice of having one matron per area. The conclusion was that, when planning to achieve improvements in safety and quality in a high-risk area such as a labour ward, one whole time equivalent, at 37.5 hours a week, is insufficient. To increase visibility of midwifery leadership on the ‘shop floor’, the labour matron job description has been reviewed, refocussing it to be more clinically focused as, unfortunately, this role had become a transactional management role. This has supported the supernumerary labour ward co-ordinator midwife by challenging the status quo, when needed. There has been a tangible change in culture. The atmosphere is positive and energised.


    CONSULTANT MIDWIVES IN THE UK: A MAPPING PROJECT OF CLINICAL LEADERSHIP

    Speakers: Caitlin Wilson, consultant midwife, University of Worcester

    The role of the consultant midwife was developed in 1999 by the Department of Health in response to demands for clinical leadership within midwifery. Since inception 18 years ago, there has been little focus on the development and changes to the role in response to the changing demands of the NHS. In late 2016, the Consultant Midwives National Forum Group, in conjunction with the RCM, carried out a mapping exercise all four countries of the United Kingdom. This is the first time that mapping of the consultant midwife role has been carried out. Traditionally, consultant midwives occupied specialities related to normal birth and public health. But the initial findings suggest that the role has changed with a growing diversity of clinical specialities and clinical leadership focus. The data suggests that there are 72 consultant midwives in the UK and 53% of them are aged 50+ with 23% already 55+ and nearing retirement. This potentially indicates a future skills gap for the role of consultant midwife and further work is needed to examine the succession planning of the role. This project aims to highlight such issues and recommend areas for further examination and research.


    APPLYING ‘UPSTREAM LEARNING’ TO PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE/INCIDENT REVIEWS

    Speakers: Jillian Ireland, midwife advocate for quality, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

    This session describes a new approach to patient safety and improved practice that has been implemented at one unit. The trust now considers a professional practice incident in terms of risk management, individual issues, the NMC Code and system issues , such as staffing levels and acuity, and skill mix. A panel meets as soon as possible after an incident is identified to arrange informal meetings with individual staff members. Registrants are invited to a shared learning event with ground rules agreed at the outset. A clarification of values starts the meeting before moving onto a discussion of claims, concerns and issues with a skilled facilitator guiding the process. There is an avoidance of blame – the emphasis is on learning and moving the issues towards solutions. The facilitator shares both good practice and practice/professional issues identified and, ultimately, any actions required are distributed with future plans for remediation meetings or feedback to service users as appropriate. Learning is shared with the whole staff team. This has been done by running an audit addressing a practice issue, involving staff in designing the tool and sharing the results using a variety of means. Video footage of a mock practice review panel will be shared.


  • ABSTRACTS

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    THE HEART OF MATERNITY

    Chair: Julie Richards, board member, RCM

    Speakers: Kate Mortimer, midwife, Harrogate District Foundation Trust and Helen Woollatt, midwife and labour ward co-ordinator, Harrogate District Foundation Trust.

    “The heART of maternity” was an art competition open to all staff aimed at boosting morale. The competition ran for a month and a half with entries exhibited on the labour ward corridor. Staff from across the unit entered works including drawings, collage, paintings, and clay formations. The only requirement for entry was willingness and an open mind; no artistic skills were necessary. One painted the oxytocin chemical symbol using names of staff in the department, reflecting on the teamwork that helped support her as a newly qualified midwife. Another made a clay sculpture of her hands, reflecting all the amazing things they had done as a midwife. Some pieces were shared through social media with one painting receiving thousands of likes, shares and comments. The artist, a maternity support worker, was inspired to begin painting professionally. The morale generated on the unit was immeasurable. Many in the team commented on how inspired they felt and that it had reminded them of what was important to them. Women and partners attending the unit stopped to appreciate the work. This simple but highly effective project enabled staff to relax and reflect, to reignite their passion, and celebrate the profession.


    KEEPING MOTHERS AND BABIES TOGETHER

    Speakers: Mary Hannahway, senior charge midwife, Greater Glasgow and Clyde, and Rhona Wilson , advanced neonatal nurse practitioner, Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

    This project aimed to keep mothers and newborns together rather than separating them for treatment. Previously, term babies who had an increased risk of early onset sepsis, and therefore required intravenous (IV) antibiotics immediately following delivery, were transferred to the nearby neonatal unit (NNU) for IV cannulation. This meant separation from their mother for about two hours at a crucial time in the mother / baby bonding process. To prevent unnecessary infant –maternal separation after birth, a clinical pathway and appropriate training was implemented to cannulate babies in labour ward. A secondary aim was to ensure babies received the first dose of antibiotics within one hour of the decision to treat. A bespoke cannulation trolley was introduced together with staff training for those who were tasked with stocking the trolley. All labour ward staff were trained to generate a timely infant CHI number, to minimise delays in obtaining results. In the first four months of the project, 79 babies were identified as requiring IV antibiotics and 78 (98.7%) were successfully cannulated without separation from their mother. The response from staff and parents has been universally positive and in addition the number of short- term admissions to the NNU has been reduced by approximately 280 per annum.


  • ABSTRACTS

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    IS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE PERINEAL PRACTICE AT THE TIME OF BIRTH TRANSLATED INTO CURRENT NHS TRUST GUIDELINES?

    Chair: Birte Harlev-Lam, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Sara Stride, midwifery lecturer, Bournemouth University

    Evidence is accumulating to identify best practice to inform midwives’ knowledge and understanding of reducing perineal tear rates, but little is known about the translation of this evidence into current NHS maternity guidelines. The aim of this research was to update the understanding of perineal practice at the time of birth. This presentation reports on one particular aspect of the study, namely the analysis of NHS maternity guidelines from across the UK in relation to intrapartum care of the perineum. Intrapartum maternity guidelines relating to care of the perineum at the time of birth were collected following contact with heads of midwifery across the UK. The guidelines were compared and contrasted to the NICE lntrapartum Guidelines of 2015. Further analysis took place in order to identify common themes regarding perineal care at the time of birth, and to identify whether they included reference to evidence based information. Common themes included advice about suitable positions for women to adopt during labour and birth. A small number of guidelines advised midwives on whether to adopt a ‘hands-on’ or ‘hands-off’ approach to perineal care. This presentation will be an interactive discussion using audience iPhone and iPad equipment and an audience response software to further explore current practice.




    WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP TO IMPROVE SAFETY AND QUALITY IN THE SURVEILLANCE OF FETAL GROWTH

    Chair: coming soon

    Speakers: Mandy Williams, health informatics clinical lead, The Perinatal Institute


    Most stillbirths due to fetal growth restriction (FGR) are associated with suboptimal care and are potentially avoidable. To address this, many use the GROW (Gestational Related Optimal Weight) stand-alone web application, which produces a customised growth chart for each pregnancy, by adjusting for characteristics such as maternal height, weight, parity and ethnic origin. However, investigations into missed cases have highlighted the problem of human errors such as inputting the wrong data, inaccuracies in plotting fetal growth measurements and clinicians not recognising abnormal fetal growth patterns and therefore not referring for further investigations. To address these challenges and improve patient safety, a GROW-API (application programming interface) has been developed, whereby the GROW software can be integrated with any Maternity Information Systems (MIS). Advantages of this include reduced need for double entry of data, saving clinicians’ time, and reducing opportunity for human error by auto-plotting of fundal height and estimated fetal weight measurements. To date, the GROW-API has partnered with five UK maternity information system providers and is being rolled out in a number of areas. Feedback has been positive, with reported improvements in accuracy of data entry and plotting. A more formal evaluation is planned, together with phase two of GROW-API.

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    REDUCING ADOLESCENT MATERNAL DEATH IN SIERRA LEONE: WHY PARTNERSHIP MATTERS

    Chair: Jenny Hall, board member, RCM

    Speakers: Lucy November, midwife research fellow, Kings College London

    Sierra Leone has an estimated maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 1,100 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births - the highest in the world. However, for teenagers the risks are exacerbated, with an increased MMR for young women under 20. To better understand the factors that put younger women at greater risk, research was undertaken with the aim of partnering with a local non-governmental organisation (NGO) to develop and evaluate an intervention to reduce these risks and prevent the deaths of adolescent girls and their babies. The research involved focus groups and interviews with adolescent mothers and youths, midwives and other health workers, teachers and community leaders, and UN agencies and senior policy-makers from two government departments. Overarching themes include social stigma and abandonment, and lack of trust in health services. The potential intervention that is emerging from the data is a mentoring scheme co-ordinated by the NGO, where local women mentor pregnant teenagers to increase uptake of antenatal care, ensure birth preparation, and advocating for them if necessary. They also provide vital postnatal support. A micro finance model would reduce the impact of the poverty associated with stigma and abandonment. This will be an inspiring presentation for anyone interested in midwifery or research in a developing world setting.



    MATERNAL AND NEWBORN HEALTH IN CONFLICT ZONES

    Speaker: Claire Reading, midwife, Medecins Sans Frontieres

    It is more dangerous being a woman than being a soldier in modern conflict’. Drawing upon frontline experiences this session will cover reproductive health challenges faced by women and babies ‘on the move’ during times of conflict and how to respond to the sexual and reproductive health needs in times of crises. Also covered will be the crippling effects that post-conflict and ongoing conflicts have on access to healthcare; and the result that a lack of education has upon women and babies’ healthcare, specifically a lack of educated and skilled birth attendants. Furthermore, the role of the midwife in low-income settings, and how this is such a vital position in times of humanitarian crises in terms of providing safe abortion care, improving access and education to family planning methods and supporting and caring for survivors of sexual and gender based violence.

FRINGE PROGRAMME

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    FRINGE SESSION 1
    PILATES: THE BENEFITS FOR YOU AND THE WOMEN IN YOUR CARE

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Nikki Kelham, physio-led pilates instructor, Complete Pilates

    Pilates is hugely important in ante and post natal care, this session will equip you to share those benefits with the women you see every day. Led by Chartered Physiotherapist Nikki Kelham, the session will deliver practical, proven insights in an interactive format. You will learn the basics of pilates for yourself, you will be given tools to aid you in your role, and you may even have a bit of fun too!

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    NHS ENGLAND SESSION 1
    IN THIS TOGETHER: AN EXAMPLE OF CHOICE AND PERSONALISATION

    Speakers: Donna Evans, better births choice pioneer and the representative coordinating, SHIP

    Join Donna Evans from SHIP, a shining example of the implementation of Better Births, through the lens of a choice pioneer. Facing the challenges and the opportunities that Personal Maternity Care Budgets bring to the system and to the experience of the women and their families.

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    FRINGE SESSION 2
    PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH: WHAT IS IT? WHY DOES IT MATTER?

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speakers: Sasha Barber, mental health and bereavement lead, Women and Children’s Health Southmead Hospital and Claire Nutt, midwife, North Bristol NHS Trust

    We recognise the huge impact that midwives can have on a women’s journey during pregnancy especially if they are struggling with mental health issues, we also recognise the barriers to working meaningfully during this time. This interactive session will leave you feeling more informed and confident around working with women in the perinatal period and explore how you can look after your own health and stay resilient in practice.

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    FRINGE SESSION 3
    SPONSORED SESSION- IllUMINA: NON-INVASIVE PERINATAL TESTING (NIPT): WHAT DO MIDWIVES NEED TO KNOW?

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Lieve Page-Christiaens, associate director, Illumina

    Prenatal genetic screening for women With recent updates to the National Screening Committee (NSC) guidelines, the UKNSC have agreed to introduce non-invasive prenatal testing to antenatal screening(1). Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), which analyzes cfDNA circulating in maternal blood, is a relatively new option in prenatal screening and testing for trisomy 21 and other common chromosomal aneuploidies. Join us at the Royal College of Midwives Annual Conference to hear from experts about how you can help expectant parents understand NIPT. Attend our workshop to find out more and get your free pregnancy wheel.* *Available on a first come, first served basis.

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    FRINGE SESSION 4
    BIRTH TRAUMA RESOLUTION THERAPY- A NEW WAY OF THINKING IN BIRTH TRAUMA TREATMENT.

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Jenny Mullan, birth trauma specialist ( Psychotherapist and counsellor ) , founder Birth Trauma Resolution Therapy

    Birth Trauma Resolution Therapy comes at a time when the world is crying out for system of treatment that can quickly and effectively dissolve the hugely debilitating symptoms of birth trauma/PTSD. The Birth Trauma Association estimates that 10,000 women in Britain each year are treated for PTSD as a result of a traumatic birth (McLaren 2017). This session will give insight into how to recognise and treat birth trauma/ PTSD and the training that is available to help you.

  • FRINGE DAY 1

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    FRINGE SESSION 5
    DELIVERING DIFFICULT NEWS DURING PREGNANCY

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Jane Fisher, director, Antenatal Results and Choices (ARC)

    This workshop will draw on research and ARC’s three decades of contact with women and couples facing difficult and often unexpected news in pregnancy. We will be looking specifically at the context of antenatal screening and focus on the experience of expectant parents. Attendees will have the opportunity to consider the personal and professional skills needed in order to give sensitive individualised care in what can be challenging circumstances.

MAIN DAY 2

  • MAIN DAY 2

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • MAIN DAY 2

    -


    PLENARY SESSION 1
    RCM CHIEF EXECUTIVE WELCOME ADDRESS

    Chair: Susan Bookbinder

    Speaker: Gill Walton, chief executive, RCM

    Panel members: Suzanne Tyler, director for services to members, Jon Skewes, director of policy, employment relations and communications, Chris Truman, director for business services and Louise Silverton, director for midwifery, RCM

    In her first address to the membership, the new RCM chief executive Gill Walton will be taking to the stage to welcome delegates to the first ever free RCM annual conference. She will be setting out her vision for the RCM as she takes up the reins amid some significant changes and challenges within the profession. But what will this mean for the membership? Gill will be explaining more during her repeated speech at the beginning of both days of the conference.

    This session is a repeat of PLENARY SESSION 1 from Day 1.


  • MAIN DAY 2

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    PLENARY SESSION 2
    ’BOUNCING BACK’: THERE’S MORE TO RESILIENCE

    Chair: Birte Harlev-Lam, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Francesca Martinez, English stand-up comedian, writer and actress

    English stand-up comedian, writer and actress Francesca Martinez first hit television screens in the BBC children’s drama series Grange Hill, when she was 14, and she has since gone on to appear in various other sitcoms and shows. Born with cerebral palsy and describing herself as ‘wobbly’, Francesca has been a firm favourite on the comedy circuit and she brings her humour, insight and experience to this year’s conference on the subject of resilience and the importance and role it plays. If you want to be informed and entertained, then don’t miss Francesca’s slot.

    This session will be repeated at 14.30.


  • MAIN DAY 2

    -


    PLENARY SESSION 3
    QUESTION TIME 3: THE MODERN MIDWIFE

    Chair: Mandy Forrester, head of quality and standards, RCM

    Speakers: Stephen McGann, English actor, author, science communicator and star of Call the Midwife, Ellie Durant, midwifery writer, blogger, student supporter and author, Midwives Diaries,Joshua Downey, midwife, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust- City Hospital Campus and Justine Roberts, CEO, Mumsnet

    What does it mean to be a practising midwife in 2017? How is the profession viewed by those on the outside? Has this changed? BBC 1’s Call the Midwife really brought the profession to the forefront of most people’s minds – it was the subject of much discussion, student applications rocketed and the general media took an instant interest. But with the heightened visibility and reports, such as Kirkup, it could be said the midwife image has been somewhat tarnished. A midwife blogger, Ellie Durant, male midwife Joshua Downey and the CEO of Mumsnet Justine Roberts discuss the issues. Bring your perspective to what has the potential to be a very interesting debate.


  • MAIN DAY 2

    -


    PLENARY SESSION 4
    ’BOUNCING BACK’: THERE’S MORE TO RESILIENCE


    Chair: Birte Harlev-Lam, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Francesca Martinez, English stand-up comedian, writer and actress

    English stand-up comedian, writer and actress Francesca Martinez first hit television screens in the BBC children’s drama series Grange Hill, when she was 14, and she has since gone on to appear in various other sitcoms and shows. Born with cerebral palsy and describing herself as ‘wobbly’, Francesca has been a firm favourite on the comedy circuit and she brings her humour, insight and experience to this year’s conference on the subject of resilience and the importance and role it plays. If you want to be informed and entertained, then don’t miss Francesca’s slot.

    *Please note that this is a repeat of the 10:45 session


  • MAIN DAY 2

    -


    PLENARY SESSION 5
    QUESTION TIME 4: CONTINUITY OF CARER: POSITIVE FOR ALL?


    Chair: Mary Ross-Davie, director, RCM Scotland

    Speakers: Matt Tagney, maternity transformation programme director,Kathy Murphy, deputy director of nursing and head of midwifery , Saint Mary\'s Hospital, Manchester,Genevieve Porritt, mother and Iona Duckett, midwifery team leader, Angus Birth Unit.

    Continuity of carer isn’t a new model. But the recent maternity reviews in England and Scotland have brought it to the fore again. We can’t ignore the issues. Some midwives are working within a continuity model and have great job satisfaction, but for others, it’s resulted in burnout. Yet research indicates that the impact on women’s experiences and outcomes are positive. How can the two be reconciled? How can it work effectively for midwives and remain positive for women? This debate will take a look at these questions and more to explore the lessons we’ve learnt from previous incarnations and what the future of the profession will look like with the model at its heart. Join HoMs Justine Craig and Kathy Murphy, new mum Genevieve Porritt and the Maternity Transformation Programme’s director, Matt Tagney to voice your thoughts.


  • MAIN DAY 2

    -


    PLENARY SESSION 6
    MOTHERHOOD AND OTHERHOOD

    Chair: Suzanne Tyler, director for services to members, RCM

    Speaker: Hollie McNish, poet

    Breastfeeding and sex after birth… Just two of the topics that poet and YouTuber Hollie McNish, winner of this year’s Ted Hughes poetry award for new work in poetry, writes and performs about, and she’ll be bringing her unique style to this year’s conference as she closes the two-day event. Talking about her performance of Embarrassed, about breastfeeding her daughter in a public toilet because of the stigma of feeding in public, to The Guardian, she said: ‘A lot of midwives come to my gigs and they say they secretly show the video on their phones to mothers who are embarrassed or uncomfortable about feeding. When I started writing poetry full-time, I thought, this is a bit airy, a bit arty farty isn’t it? But it’s actually been quite practical.’ Why not come along and listen to the sheer brilliance of Hollie’s performance and round the conference off in true style?


STUDENT PROGRAMME

  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

    -


    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 1
    RCM PRESIDENT WELCOME ADDRESS

    Chair: Day 1: Alana Divito , SMF member Day 2: Jenny Pope, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Day 1: Kathryn Gutteridge, president, RCM Day 2: Jacque Gerrard, director, RCM England

    She was only inaugurated recently, but Kathryn Gutteridge will be opening this year’s conference with her first official address to the RCM’s student membership. Kathryn is an established consultant midwife with a long history in clinical care within the NHS, and works at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust. Passionate about women’s issues and particularly in relation to childbearing, Kathryn has a reputation for representing women’s psychological and mental wellbeing during this vulnerable stage of their lives. Student delegates shouldn’t miss this welcome by such an incredibly experienced and well-known face within the profession.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 2
    HUMAN RIGHTS MATTER IN CHILDBIRTH

    Chair: Day 1: Alana Divito, SMF member Day 2: Jenny Pope, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Rebecca Schiller, chief executive, Birthrights

    Rebecca is the head of the UK’s only organisation dedicated to improving women’s experience of pregnancy and childbirth by promoting respect for human rights, so she is the ideal motivational speaker on women’s voices. But why do human rights in childbirth matter? How can a human rights perspective help you as a student midwife? And how can information around the importance of women’s dignity and choice be disseminated? Rebecca will look to answer these questions and more, so don’t miss the first main student session after the RCM president.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 3
    ARE YOU NATURALLY RESILIENT?

    Chair: Day 1: Charlene Cole, SMF member Day 2: Alice Kersey, SMF member, RCM

    Speaker: Lesley Choucri senior lecturer part time, University of Salford

    Lesley is senior lecturer at the University of Salford and she will talk about the programme of resilience and self-care that she has developed as part of a preceptorship programme. She has more than three decades of experience in midwifery practice, education, management and research and has managed maternity, gynaecology and children’s services in the NHS, instigated new ways of working through designing midwife-led care and worked across the interfaces of education, clinical practice and research.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 4
    THE THREE YEARS ARE COMING TO AN END… WHAT NOW?

    Chair: Day 1: Alice Kersey, SMF member, RCM Day 2: Louise Webster, SMF member, RCM

    Speakers: Sarah Snow, head of department & lead midwife for education, Oxford Brookes University and Jude Jones, birth centre midwife, Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

    The road from student to newly qualified midwife requires an even broader range of skills and development than your clinical knowledge and assignment skillset, involving job applications and interviews. Preceptorship and becoming a qualified practising midwife are every students’ ultimate goal. But what are the skills required? What will make your application stand out from the rest? What does the interview process entail? How does preceptorship work? And what should you consider in making the transition from student to newly qualified midwife? Oxford Brookes University’s head of department & lead midwife for education, Sarah Snow and Jude Jones, a previous RCM Student Midwives Forum member and a qualified midwife for the past two years, guide you to success.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 5
    MEDIA: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE SOCIAL

    Chair : Day 1: Elizabeth Barilli, SMF member, RCM Day 2: Charlene Cole, SMF member, RCM

    Speakers: Day 1: Natalie Linder, labour ward coordinator, Western Sussex NHS Foundation Trust / board deputy chair, RCM, Day 2: Ellie Durrant, Cara Evans, student midwife, University of Nottingham and Hana Pauls, midwife and naturopathic doctor, Liverpool Women’s Hospital and start of One Born Every Minute.

    Social media has revolutionised the way we interact with one another. Its impact is felt in every aspect of our personal and professional lives and no more is this true with the life of a student midwife. As the NMC highlights: ‘If used responsibly and appropriately, social networking sites can build and maintain professional relationships; establish support networks to discuss specific issues with other healthcare professionals globally; and access resources for CPD.’ How this can be achieved, the ways it can be used as a learning tool and for keeping up to date with research will be explored by midwife blogger Ellie Durant and the RCM’s student winner of the ICM competition, Cara Evans.


  • STUDENT MIDWIVES

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    STUDENT PLENARY SESSION 6
    YOU’VE GOT 90 SECONDS

    Chair: Rachel Evans, SMF member, RCM


    Speaker: Gill Walton, chief executive, RCM

    Do you have an idea that you think could change an aspect of maternity care for the better? If so, then the new RCM chief executive Gill Walton will want to know all about it. You will need to submit your ideas before the session, in writing, and a selection will be chosen to present them to Gill within a 90-second timeframe. Gill will decide, with the help of the audience, who wins a prize. In previous years, Cathy Warwick has taken a keen interest in the enthusiastic suggestions from students, and we’re sure Gill won’t be any different. So why not start having a think now?


MSW PROGRAMME

  • MSW

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    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 1

    HOW DO MSWs FIT INTO THE CHANGING MATERNITY SERVICE?

    Chair: Suzanne Tyler, director for services to members, RCM

    Speakers: Cherylene Dougan, maternity care assistant, Dumfries and Galloway, Abbie Aplin, director of midwifery and maternity, and Justine West, Band 3 maternity support worker, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust.



    In light of the latest reviews into maternity services – Better Births and the Best Start – an impact on MSWs and the way they work will be inevitable. This has the potential to open up opportunities to MSWs, shaping maternity care of the future. But what are some MSWs already doing in UK trusts and beyond? We hear from two – Portsmouth and Dumfries & Galloway. MSWs are playing a key role in a continuity of carer model at Portsmouth for women undergoing caesareans; and Cherylene Dougan talks about her experience as a member of the sub-group of Scotland’s Best Start. Hear their stories and take the opportunity to ask a question to find out more.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 2
    EXPLORING THE SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

    Chair/Speaker: Denise Linay, head of organising and engagement, RCM

    Speaker: Richard Griffin, senior research fellow, King\'s College London



    The role, banding and training received by MSWs varies widely across the countries, in fact, even the job title can be different. Why not join us in a debate with Richard Griffin, who’s been commissioned by the RCM to gather data about MSWs’ roles, attitudes, learning, tasks and supervision, and the RCM’s head of organising and engagement Denise Linay to look at your experiences in your trusts and what the future holds for the role. Richard will be showcasing the results of his research and discussing how the results can drive future developments. This is a chance for you to speak out and discuss the issues in this Q&A-style discussion.


  • MSW

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    MSW PLENARY SESSION 3
    MSWs CARING FOR VULNERABLE WOMEN

    Chair: Karen Edwards, regional head England South, RCM

    Speakers: Sasha Barber, mental health and bereavement lead, Women and Children’s Health Southmead Hospital and Mark Williams, international fathers mental health campaigner, speaker and trainer, Fathers Reaching Out

    Would you like to learn more about caring for those women who’ve suffered a bereavement or who are coping with mental health issues? In a recent survey MSWs identified these as the top two issues they wanted more information and learning on, hence this was introduced to the programme. So why not come along and engage with Sasha Barber, Mental Health & Bereavement Lead, Women & Children’s Health Southmead Hospital along with a perinatal mental health specialist and a father, Mark Williams, who’s wife’s postnatal depression affected his own mental health? It promises to be a really interesting and insightful session.


ABSTRACTS DAY 2

  • ABSTRACTS DAY 2

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    HIGH VELOCITY LEARNING: SPEED AND EXCELLENCE MATTER

    Chair: Tracy Miller, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Sarah Stables, consultant midwife, Barnsley NHS Foundation Trust

    This unit has developed two innovative and dynamic paths of high velocity learning. The first is monthly online web chats on a closed social media platform and the second is the development of a closed YouTube channel named MidEd. It is now possible to quickly translate local or specific issues into learning for the whole unit. In a recent example, a woman who had been affected by a fourth degree perineal tear felt that her care could have been improved with better postnatal information on the ward. From this feedback, a multidisciplinary approach to learning was fostered. The woman’s physiotherapy department produced two short videos, in conjunction with the midwifery team, which were then uploaded onto the MidEd channel. The first clip was information given to women with a third or fourth degree tear and the second focused on teaching pelvic floor exercises. The link was posted onto the closed Facebook page and a virtual meeting was arranged to discuss the issue of perineal healing and information to be given to affected women. This is a new and developing concept within the unit but is already a cost neutral method of improving the midwives’ knowledge and, ultimately, the woman’s journey through our services.


    ‘AMAZING BUT DAUNTING’: ENHANCING STUDENTS’ COMMUNICATION SKILLS VIA ‘SAFE’ SIMULATION WITH PROFESSIONAL ACTORS AND 360 DEGREE FEEDBACK

    Speakers: Dr Helen Bedford, and Rachel Lavelle midwifery lecturers, University of York

    This presentation showcases an innovative learning and assessment activity within a second year undergraduate midwifery education module. Communication workshops are held within a university-based Clinical Simulation Unit (CSU). The aim of them is to help students develop and refine sophisticated communication skills, which can be a challenging process. Rather than developing their ability in a range of complex settings, typically under the guidance of sign-off mentors in clinical practice, the students can hone their skills in a safe space. Working together in small self-selected peer groups, students engage in unseen, realistic practice-based scenarios with professional actors playing the roles of simulated patients, relatives and maternity staff. The scenarios are devised and facilitated by midwifery lecturers, who create these safe spaces for the students to engage, reflect and receive real-time 360 degree feedback from peers, actors (in and out of character) and lecturers. Following the workshops, students privately review and reflect on their filmed performance and the 360 degree feedback. They then write a reflective essay. Student feedback on the module is that it is challenging but immensely worthwhile for communication skills development.


  • ABSTRACTS DAY 2

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    WOMEN FIRST
    IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL MATERNITY REVIEW IN RURAL AREAS

    Chair: Michelle Beacock, board member, RCM

    Speakers: Wendy Cutchie, lead midwife, Shrewsbury & Telford Hospital NHS Trust

    Despite evidence and NICE guidance, use of freestanding midwifery-led units (MLUs) has steadily decreased in the last eight years. A lead midwife for community services from a rural county reached out to the Midwifery Unit Network (MUNet), which in turn led to her joining forces with two others to arrange a conference. The aim was to embrace Better Births while avoiding the threat of centralising and reducing the number and range of services to women in a large rural county. The three-woman team came together via Skype and email over a period of four months before involving others, including service users, Healthwatch, NHS England, the RCM, and academics. Baroness Julia Cumberlege chaired the conference, which had a line-up of nationally and internationally respected speakers. It attracted 100 delegates. Highlights included midwifery managers and consultant midwives sharing their journeys to set goals to develop their local services; local service users’ stories of midwifery compassion in the MLUs, which was very emotional; commissioners and campaigners who discussed the importance of public health or economic arguments for continuing free-standing unit births and postnatal stays across large rural counties. Evaluations received were phenomenally supportive of the conference, with requests for repeat events around the country in the future.


    WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP TO EXPLORE STILLBIRTH LOCALLY ACROSS A FIVE YEAR PERIOD

    Speaker: Catriona Jones , lecturer in midwifery, University of Hull

    The UK stillbirth rate appears to have declined over the last decade, but this downward trend may be partly due to changes in the legal definition of stillbirth. Exact definitions for stillbirth vary, largely differing in terms of gestational age. Compared to countries in Europe and North America, the UK rate is relatively high and there are local and regional variations. To address this, a successful partnership approach between academics, commissioners and service providers explored incidences of stillbirth in one area with a higher than average stillbirth rate. They aimed to establish trends in the stillbirth rate over a five year period, including causes of stillbirth, effect of relevant risk factors and demographic factors. They used identified risk factors from CMACE 2011, and other research based evidence, in relation to the causes of stillbirth. Data were collected on prevalence and causes of stillbirth, fetal characteristics (including birthweight and gestation), reason for referral prior to intra uterine death identification, demographic factors, engagement with antenatal care, and identified and known risk factors for stillbirth. This presentation will illustrate the process, the findings and the ongoing work in relation to this collaborative project.


  • ABSTRACTS DAY 2

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    C4U - IMPROVING MORALE, BUILDING RESILIENCE AND IMPROVING ENGAGEMENT. CAN WE FIX IT – YES WE CAN!

    Chair: Natalie Linder, board member, RCM

    Speakers: Abigail Holmes, consultant midwife and Laura Bassett, risk manager of obstetrics and gynaecology, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

    A healthy workplace initiative, via the Caring for You charter, is going from strength to strength in this workplace. One of its initiatives has been to develop staff resilience days. These comprise taught sessions on how to build resilience and leaving behind a bad day, as well as interactive events such as reflexology. The days have been a resounding success with excellent evaluation. Midwives can self-select or are nominated by their manager, perhaps because they have been involved in an incident or have lost confidence after being away from the workplace for a length of time. The team encourage staff to share their experiences to facilitate others’ learning. Insights demonstrated by resilient midwives have important benefits for all, including managers who may be able to develop personal and organisational initiatives to support midwives. To enhance communication, the team have also set up a Facebook group for staff members – within four hours it had 240 members. Staff are engaged, seeking ideas for service improvement and developing leadership skills themselves As Wales moves to its new model of clinical supervision for midwives, the foundations of the work undertaken to date will be developed further.


    WHY DO NEWLY QUALIFIED MIDWIVES LEAVE THE PROFESSION? A THEMATIC ANALYSIS

    Speaker: Alex Hawkins-Drew, consultant midwife, HSC Guernsey

    Midwifery 2020 suggested that the first five years post qualification is the time critical period when the profession sees the highest number of staff leaving. RCM evidence suggests that up to 10% of midwives leave the profession within 12 months of qualifying. Given the estimated cost to the NHS is £45,000 per student midwife trained, this is of concern. This research involved a thematic analysis of qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews with six participants who met the research criteria. The aim was to explore the reasons for newly qualified midwives leaving the profession within two years of qualifying, including those who qualified yet never practised as a midwife. Workplace culture was a key theme in each participant’s interview. The study also revealed that most of the recruits harboured feelings of unpreparedness, expressing thoughts that their midwifery education had not provided the correct amount of exposure to various skills. In addition, the participants described a wretched dichotomy regarding their clinical autonomy and the reality of midwifery in a modern NHS setting. This research has not been shared publicly since it was completed in October 2016. It is particularly pertinent to the current climate of staffing concern within the NHS.


  • ABSTRACTS DAY 2

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    SEPSIS - A RACE AGAINST TIME

    Chair: Pauline Twigg, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Elizabeth Williams, student midwife, University of South Wales

    In the UK, the risk of death from maternal sepsis is 2.0 in 100, 000 maternities. However, the extent of severe morbidity is 50 times greater, with identified links to preterm birth. Early detection of severe illness is a challenge because the signs of sepsis in pregnant women can be less distinctive than in the non-pregnant population. A poster was designed with its intended purpose as a sepsis aide memoir to remind health professionals in all clinical environments to ‘Think Sepsis’ when presented with an unwell woman of childbearing age. A challenge in the management of maternal sepsis is the application of the evidence-based findings into clinical practice. Findings estimate that each patient treated using the care bundle results in a cost saving of £3,600 and a 3.4-day reduction in length of hospital stay. If the care bundle is implemented for 80% of septic patients in the United Kingdom, 10,000 lives would be saved and it would save the NHS £170 million each year. Therefore, the motivation to promote maternal sepsis as a matter of public health is to improve the recognition and response to the acutely deteriorating woman whilst raising awareness of the risks of sepsis in pregnancy.


    CASELOAD CARE OF DIABETIC PREGNANT WOMEN – A MODEL OF CONTINUITY

    Speakers: Jenny Roddy and Cathy Tabner, diabetes specialist midwife, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

    Leeds maternity strategy created an enhanced midwifery pathway for a population of pregnant women with diabetes. Providing one-to-one care to women with complex medical histories and pre-existing conditions allows care to be seamless across the midwifery and medical paradigms, thus increasing safety as they get to know the women, and their needs, so well. As a team of four midwives, they have created a unique care pathway, which incorporates a multi-disciplinary approach from a team of diabetologists, obstetricians, diabetic specialist nurses, dietitians, and sonographers. There is a close working relationship with the whole team with regular meetings, phone and email contact to provide a close network of communication. There is routine antenatal colostrum harvesting from 36 weeks and early audit figures have shown a rise in breastfeeding rates with type one diabetic women. There are hopes to facilitate postnatal support groups to reinforce lifestyle modification and behavioural change therapies. There are two large combined diabetic / obstetric clinics where they regularly see 100 women a week. In addition to case-loading care, each positive gestational diabetic woman is phoned to counsel them about their diagnosis. They receive outstanding feedback from the women in their care.


  • ABSTRACTS DAY 2

    -


    WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES OF MATERNITY BLADDER CARE

    Chair: Helene Marshall, board member, RCM

    Speaker: Zoi Vardavaki, research midwife, Barts Health NHS Trust

    This session explores the preliminary findings of research to explore women’s experiences, perceptions and knowledge of bladder care during the antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum period. The research, which is ongoing, is being conducted via semi-structured interviews with eight to 16 women who gave birth to a singleton, live, term baby between two weeks and six months. There is a heterogeneous representation of the different modes of birth, including vaginal deliveries with/without epidural, planned/emergency cesarean sections, perineal damage and instrumental deliveries. To date, nine women have participated. Findings suggest that information about a healthy bladder depends on women’s willingness to ask. Participants tended to diminish the importance of bladder/urinary problems and normalise the symptoms. Some women self-blamed for not performing pelvic floor exercises in the postpartum period when noticeable changes were present. Pelvic floor exercises are an area that require improvement with mixed advice and uncertainty regarding how to do them, how frequently and when to stop. The majority of women were unaware of pelvic floor exercises during pregnancy. Although these findings are preliminary, midwives must fill the gap identified in maternity bladder care by raising awareness, support and promoting a healthy bladder.


    CHOICE OF BIRTH PLACE FOR WOMEN REGARDLESS OF RISK PROFILE: VIEWS OF HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS AND POLICY MAKERS IN NORTHERN IRELAND - A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Speaker: Hannah Mccauley, team leader, South Eastern Trust

    When women with ‘high risk’ pregnancies choose to give birth at home, it is usually against the advice of health care providers. In these circumstances, healthcare providers are caring for women whose decisions reflect different perceptions of risk from their own. This session explores a study that sought to assess healthcare providers’ and policy makers’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of where women should give birth, regardless of their risk profile. Semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted with healthcare providers and policy makers working in three health and social care trusts in Northern Ireland. The research is on-going, but the emerging themes are that health care providers and policy makers welcome clarification and a clearer understanding of how they can professionally and legally work with women to support their choices, regardless of risk profile during pregnancy and childbirth. Some of the health care providers were keen to support women and their partners to make proactive and informed choices. However, some continue to feel that policies and guideline dictate women’s choice. The development of a multi-disciplinary working group with clearer lines of communication to support women to birth in a place of their choice, regardless of risk profile, has been suggested.


FRINGE PROGRAMME DAY 2

  • FRINGE DAY 2

    -


    REGISTRATION

    Main registration will open at 08.30 and will be open throughout the duration of conference.


  • FRINGE DAY 2

    -


    NHS SESSION 2
    IMPLEMENTING BETTER BIRTHS

    Speakers: Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, head of maternity, children & young people, NHS England, Matt Tagney, maternity transformation programme director, NHS England, Kate Brintworth and Annie Francis, Better Births Choice Pioneer and Lisa Ramsey and Cathy Brewster, maternity voice partnerships

    An informative and interactive session which sets out the high level strategy for implementing Better Births, through to real examples across England where transformation is happening now. Making maternity services as safe and personal as possible is at the heart of Better Births, and through Local Maternity Systems, local transformation for maternity services is becoming a reality.

  • FRINGE DAY 2

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    FRINGE SESSION 7
    BREASTFEEDING AND MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH: HOW CAN WE PROTECT BOTH

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Dr Amy Brown, associate professor child public health, Swansea University

    Formula feeding is linked with an increased risk of postnatal depression but how and why does this happen? This talk will explore the relationship between breastfeeding and maternal mental health considering biological, psychological and cultural factors that might play a role. We will examine how issues such as pain and complications, perceptions of breastfeeding as difficult and birth experiences may play a role, all embedded in wider connotations of how we treat and value new mothers.

  • FRINGE DAY 2

    -


    FRINGE SESSION 8
    THE IMPORTANCE OF FATHERS MENTAL HEALTH AND SUPPORTING ALL PARENTS

    Chair: Kathryn Manning, moderator, Redactive Events

    Speaker: Mark Williams, international fathers mental health campaigner, speaker and trainer, Fathers Reaching Out

    Mark will discuss the importance of communication and involving fathers in the labour ward. He will draw on personal experiences about his wife’s labour and how this led to him having his first ever panic attack, believe his wife Michelle and baby were going to die. Mark will not only share his story but also the knowledge he has gained after speaking to over two thousand fathers around the World. He explains the latest research and why supporting all parents really does matter for the development of the child. Birth Trauma can happen to fathers and family members too.

  • FRINGE DAY 2

    -


    FRINGE SESSION 9
    RCM ANNUAL MIDWIFERY AWARDS; HINTS AND TIPS

    Chair/ Speaker: Louise Silverton, director for midwifery, RCM

    Speakers: Kelly Pierce, consultant midwife in public health, West Sussex County Council, Patricia Schan, antenatal and newborn screening specialist midwife, Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Katharine Pearson, midwife, Guy\\\'s and St Thomas\\\' Foundation Trust

    Drop into this interactive session and get hints and tips on how to make your award entry stand out from the crowd. Hear from previous winners Kelly Pierce and Patricia Schan about the process; from the moment they thought of entering to standing on the stage receiving their awards.

Students will join the main conference in the auditorium

 

Speaker: Professor Cathy Warwick CBE,  chief executive, RCM

 

In her annual address, Cathy will discuss the challenges for maternity services, the midwifery profession and the RCM and introduce the conference theme of Safety, Standards, Experience.

Students will join the main conference in the auditorium

 

Chair: Professor Cathy Warwick CBE, chief executive, RCM
Speaker: Martin Bromiley, chair, Clinical Human Factors Group

 

In 2005, Elaine Bromiley, a 37-year-old woman attending hospital for a routine operation, died after unexpected complications led to her suffering catastrophic brain damage. Her husband, Martin Bromiley, with his perspective on safety management as a commercial airline pilot, is now an influential advocate for improved safety culture in health care. As a result of his personal experience, Martin Bromiley founded the Clinical Human Factors Group in 2007. This group brings together experts, clinicians and enthusiasts who have an interest in placing the understanding of human factors at the heart of improving patient safety.

 

Trying to wrestle with agendas that sometimes seem to reduce issues down to a binary ‘it’s either safe or it’s woman-centred’ is an enormous challenge, while we still face unacceptable variations in outcome and experience, unnecessary interventions and decision-making that doesn’t reflect the evidence. In this challenging and uplifting keynote presentation, Martin will focus on how organisations can learn from mistakes, building safety cultures that don’t blame individuals.

 

KEY REASONS TO ATTEND (delegate outcomes): 

 

  • What is the RCM’s vision for high-quality maternity care?
  • How can every individual midwife engage with the changing health care?
  • What does it take to learn and improve from adversity and tragedy?
  • What does it take to go from ‘good’ to ‘great’?

 

TOPIC AREAS COVERED:

 

  • How continuity can work for women and midwives
  • How safety and experience can be mutually enhancing
  • Challenge yourself about your aspiration, your practice and your future
  • What does a learning culture really look like?

Chair: Laura Godfrey-Isaacs, chair and Natalie Corden, deputy chair, RCM Student Midwifes Forum

 

 

Chair: Liz Wonders, RCM Student Midwives Forum member

 

Speakers: Jacque Gerrard, director, RCM England and Professor Lesley Page CBE, president, RCM

 

What does it mean to be a professional?  What accountabilities and responsibilities does a professional carry?  How is the midwifery profession changing?  How has the availability of information for women through multiple media transformed us from repositories of knowledge to interpreters of evidence in partnership with women?

The new professional – What does it mean to be a professional?  What accountabilities and responsibilities does a professional carry?  How is the midwifery profession changing?

Chair: Natalie Corden, deputy chair, Student Midwives Forum

 

Speaker: Professor Mavis Kirkham, professor of midwifery, University of the West of Scotland

This session will use two research studies, my own experience as a midwife and two poems to examine how we cope with loss and grief, especially following stillbirths and neonatal deaths. Short term and long term coping techniques will be explored together with their impact on ourselves and our practice. Particular attention will be given to caring for ourselves and each other.

Choose from one four special interest track sessions

 

1 – Inspiration: 

Chair: Emma Martley, Student Midwife, University of Cumbria and SMF Member
Supporting Pregnancy through Cancer and Beyond
Speaker: Nicolette Peel, charity chair, Mummy’s Star and midwife, university of Salford (winner of The President’s Volunteer Award 2016)

 

Blood to Baby
Speaker: Hannah Tizard, student midwife, University of Central Lancashire (winner of 
JOHNSON’S® Award for Evidence into Practice 2016)

 

 

2 – Work ready: 

Chair: Rachel Evans, RCM Student Midwives Forum member

Starting out as a midwife
Speaker: Jonathan Cliffe, newly qualified midwife, Warrington and Halton NHS Foundation Trust

 

The Manager’s viewpoint
Speaker: Carmel McCalmont, head of midwifery,  University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust

 

3 – Challenge: 

Chair: Lydia Thompson, RCM Student Midwives Forum member

Unconscious bias and equalities
Speaker: Mark Harris, midwife, Birthing for Blokes

 

Birth in the Media
Speaker: Laura Godfrey- Isaacs, newly qualified midwife, King’s College London

 

4 – Meet the experts:

Facilitating: Alana Divito and Ellie Whitaker, RCM Student Midwives Forum members

 

Delegates will rotate to join information conversations in small groups with midwifery profession leaders and RCM advisors. Our experts and topics include:

Changing Practice

Amanda Burleigh, RCM board member

Continuity

Lyndall Hall, RCM Better Births

Health, Safety and Wellbeing

Amy Leversidge, employment relations advisor, RCM

Setting up a Midwifery Society

Denise Linay, head of organising and engagement, RCM

Getting involved in the RCM

Natalie Linder, RCM board member

Continuing your learning

Carmel Lloyd, head of education and learning, RCM

Making services accessible

Gergana Nikolovna, RCM Fellow

What I look for when recruiting

Lynne Pacanowski, RCM board member

Midwifery vision and values

Professor Lesley Page CBE, president, RCM

Getting into research

Octavia Wiseman, research assistant, REACH Pregnancy Programme, City, University of London

Chair: Natalie Corden, deputy chair, RCM Student Midwives Forum

 

Maternal Mental Health

Speakers: Dr Liz McDonald, consultant perinatal psychiatrist, chair of Royal College of Psychiatrists Perinatal Faculty, member NICE Guideline Development Group and Emily Slater, campaign manager, Maternal Mental Health Alliance

One in five mothers suffer from depression, suicide, anxiety and in some cases psychosis during pregnancy, yet service provision is lamentably inadequate.  Midwives play a central role in supporting the emotional well-being of women, their babies and families, to ensure that all women with mental health concerns get appropriate and timely care. The RCM believes that all health professionals should give equal importance to women’s mental and physical health, throughout pregnancy and after the birth. In this session student delegates will gain insight into the experience of women who suffer mental illness during or after pregnancy, understand the role of midwives in supporting women and families and hear from a leading consultant psychiatrist on the need for more effective, better resourced identification and treatment of women at risk.

Chair: Shaunee Jamieson, Student Midwives Forum member

 

Facilitated by: Professor Cathy Warwick CBE, chief executive, RCM

 

This lively and interactive session is your chance to shine by presenting a single idea which would make a difference in improving maternity services.  In this session facilitated by RCM Chief Executive Professor Cathy Warwick, any delegate can put forward an idea for discussion.  Those selected will have just 90 seconds to explain their idea to the conference.  Cathy will then help the presenter to expand on their idea or shape it, and take questions from delegates.  At the end of the session, delegates will vote for the best idea for which the presenter will win a prize.

Click here to read more about last year’s winner.

Professor Cathy Warwick CBE